Mergers of teaching hospitals
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Mergers of teaching hospitals in Boston, New York, and Northern California by John A. Kastor

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Published by University of Michigan Press in Ann Arbor .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Teaching hospitals -- Administration -- Case studies.,
  • Hospital mergers -- Case studies.,
  • Multihospital systems -- Case studies.,
  • Hospitals -- Shared services -- Case studies.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 441-469) and index.

StatementJohn A. Kastor.
GenreCase studies.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsRA975.T43 K374 2001
The Physical Object
Paginationxii, 487 p. ;
Number of Pages487
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18346303M
ISBN 100472111965
LC Control Number2001027374

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If a teaching hospital loses funding, what is the next option? Mergers of Teaching Hospitals in Boston, New York, and Northern Californiainvestigates the recent mergers of six of the nation's most respected teaching hospitals. The author explains the reasons why these institutions decided to change their governance and the factors that have allowed two of them to continue to operate while. John Kastor has meticulously outlined three specific case studies of hospital mergers of several teaching hospitals, including the Partners Healthcare System (Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital), New York—Presbyterian Hospital (The New York Hospital and Presbyterian Hospitals), and the UCLA/Stanford Hospitals. 1. Mergers of teaching hospitals: in Boston, New York, and Northern California / John A. Kastor. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN (cloth: alk. paper) 1. Teaching hospitals—Administration—Case studies. 2. Hospital mergers—Case studies. 3. Multihospital systems—Case studies. 4. John A. Kastor, M.D., a professor of medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, is the former chief of the Cardiovascular Division at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and former chair of the Department of Medicine at is the author of Arrhythmias; Mergers of Teaching Hospitals in Boston, New York, and Northern California; Governance of Teaching.

  Mergers of Teaching Hospitals in Boston, New York, and Northern California (The University of Michigan Press, pages, , $) investigates the mergers of some of the nation's top teaching. While hospital mergers have been on the rise in recent years, they are not new to the landscape of health care. Studies have shown there is the potential for both positive and negative affects to patients/consumers, communities, and employees. Arguments for supporting hospital mergers in the past have focused on efficiency and lowered costs due [ ].   LESSONS LEARNED FROM FAILED HOSPITAL MERGERS The merger beginning in , from a single hospital with beds and revenues of $ million to a hospital consortium in with 4, beds and revenues of $ billion, described the Allegheny Health Education and Research Foundation (AHERF) of Pennsylvania. All of us in medicine, not just teaching hospital physicians, owe gratitude to John Kastor, MD, professor of medicine at the University of Maryland, for devoting many months to interviewing a host of main participants in attempted mergers involving six nationally known teaching hospitals. His book of quotes and comments will be remembered for.

This is a book about the merging of six of America’s leading teaching hospitals, where the faculties of five of the country’s most distinguished medical schools instruct their students and trainees in clinical medicine. The force driving the mergers was economic, and the name of the force was managed care. Mergers of Teaching Hospitals in Boston, New York, and Northern California investigates the recent mergers of six of the nation's most respected teaching hospitals. The author explains the reasons why these institutions decided to change their governance and the factors that have allowed two of them to continue to operate while forcing the third to dissolve after only 23 months of operation.   The consequence was a large wave of hospital mergers - out of acute hospitals 'disappeared' in the English National Health Service (NHS) between and Recent mergers were also motivated by the rush to meet the April deadline to achieve autonomous Foundation Trust (FT) status. The author suggests that the merger in Boston under the influence of only one medical school was the most successful of the 3, due in large part to the sufficient degree of autonomy allowed the practicing physicians. The New York merger is rated as a work in progress .