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vocabulary of Etruscan including the Etruscan glosses by Claudio R. Salvucci

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Published by Evolution Pub. in Southampton, Pa .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Etruscan language -- Dictionaries -- English.,
  • English language -- Dictionaries -- Etruscan.,
  • Etruscan language -- Glossaries, vocabularies, etc.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementClaudio R. Salvucci.
SeriesLanguages of classical antiquity ;, vol. 1
Classifications
LC ClassificationsP1078 .S25 1998
The Physical Object
Pagination45 p. :
Number of Pages45
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL347626M
ISBN 101889758051
LC Control Number98006754

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  Etruscan uses an alphabetic script similar to the Greek alphabet, so the author introduces us to the Etruscan language, which took a written form around BC but was extinct by the first century BC, as the Etruscan people adopted Latin and essentially became Roman/5(5). Get this from a library! A vocabulary of Etruscan: including the Etruscan glosses. [Claudio R Salvucci] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Book\/a>, schema:CreativeWork\/a> ; \u00A0\u00A0\u00A0 library. The Etruscan language also presents difficulties to the scholar. It can be easily read (the alphabet is of Greek extraction, and the sound value of the signs is known), but, with the exception of only a few words, the vocabulary is not understood. It is shown that the Etruscan vocabulary is made up of Hurro-Urartean cognates, together with Indo-European and Semitic loanwords. Keywords: Etruscan, Hurrian, Urartean, Semitic. 1. Introduction As is well known Etruscan was the language of the Etruscan people who once inhabited the area in.

The reader should also note that the Etruscan vocabulary upon which this table is based is a working vocabulary. It is composed from extant Etruscan writings. The table is not, therefore, an artificial compilation of word relationships of one language to another; rather it is an expos.   Pottery, funerary urns and wall paintings in tombs frequently carry short inscriptions, too. Unfortunately, there are very few surviving extensive written records and no books written by the Etruscans in their own language, although it is known that the Etruscans did create books made of folded linen pages (liber linteus), and those extracts which do survive point to a rich Etruscan literature. Short Etruscan Glossary: Very short, unfortunately. Etruscan Phrases: A medium-sized list of Etruscan phrases with English translations. Etruscan Vocabulary: A short list of words, divided by sets of meanings. Another Etruscan Glossary: Over entries, it claims, but you have to sign up to download it. Etruscan Verbs and Other Parts of Speech. Vocabulary Borrowings from Etruscan. Only a few hundred words of the Etruscan vocabulary are understood with some certainty. The exact count depends on whether the different forms and the expressions are included. Below is a table of some of the words grouped by topic.

NOTES. The conventions for transliterating the Etruscan script, adopted on the occasion of the Etruscology congress which took place in Leiden in , foresee the use of 3 Greek letters and 1 latin letter with a diacritic sign. To overcome the limitations of the computer font used, we employed the following symbols.   The title is very accurate. The author touches on Etruscan culture and history, but not in any depth. She makes no mention of Vinca culture symbols as possible predecessors to the Etruscan alphabet, and her short section on the runes is sterile and uninspired. But again, the book does deliver on the title’s promise/5(5). Start studying Chapter 6: The Etruscans Vocabulary. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. The book also contains a list of Etruscan personal names and a glossary of Etruscan vocabulary. A final chapter discusses the Agnone Tablet, an important inscription in Oscan, which was spoken in central Italy at the same time as (2).